Catholic Diocese of Dallas

Facebook   Twitter   Facebook    Pinterest   LinkedIn   Vimeo   RSS      

 

En Español - El Significado del Matrimonio

The Meaning of Marriage

Publish date: Friday, June 26, 2015

--

The Meaning of Marriage & Sexual Difference

  1. Marriage: What's a good starting point?
  2. Where does marriage come from?
  3. What is marriage?
  4. Why can’t marriage be “redefined” to include two men or two women?
  5. What is sexual difference?
  6. Isn’t marriage just about love and commitment between two people?
  7. Why does a person’s gender matter for marriage?
  8. How is the love between a husband and a wife irreducibly unique?
  9. What is complementarity?
  10. Why does the Catholic Church care so much about marriage?
  11. Where can I learn more about marriage?

 

1. Marriage: What’s a good starting point?

To understand what marriage is, the best place to start is with the human person. After all, marriage is a unique relationship between two specific persons, one man and one woman. We must ask, “What does it mean to be a human person, as a man or as a woman?” First, men and women are created in the image of God (see Gen 1:27). This means that they have great dignity and worth. Also, since “God is love,” (1 Jn 4:8) each person – created in God’s image – finds his or her fulfillment by loving others. Second, men and women are body-persons. The body – male or female – is an essential part of being human. Gender is not an afterthought or a mere social construct. The body shapes what it means to love as a human person. To sum up, when we think about marriage, we must think about who the human person is – created with great dignity, and called to love as a body-person, male or female.

back to top

 

2. Where does marriage come from?

“God himself is the author of marriage” (GS, no. 48). When God created human persons in his own image, as male and female, he placed in their hearts the desire, and the task, to love – to give themselves totally to another person. Marriage is one of two ways someone can make a total self-gift (the other is virginity, devoting oneself entirely to God) (see FC, no. 11). Marriage is not something thought up by human society or by any religion – rather, it springs from who the human person is, as male and female, and society and religion affirm and reinforce it. The truth of marriage is therefore accessible to everyone, regardless of their religious beliefs or lack thereof. Both faith and reason speak to the true meaning of marriage.

back to top

 

3. What is marriage?

Marriage is the lifelong partnership of mutual and exclusive fidelity between a man and a woman ordered by its very nature to the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of children (see CCC, no. 1601; CIC, can. 1055.1; GS, no. 48). The bond of marriage is indissoluble – that is, it lasts “until death do us part.” At the heart of married love is the total gift of self that husband and wife freely offer to each other. Because of their sexual difference, husband and wife can truly become “one flesh” and can give to each other “the reality of children, who are a living reflection of their love” (FC, no. 14).

Marriage between a baptized man and a baptized woman is a sacrament. This means that the bond between husband and wife is a visible sign of the sacrificial love of Christ for his Church. As a sacrament, marriage gives spouses the grace they need to love each other generously, in imitation of Christ.

back to top

 

4. Why can’t marriage be “redefined” to include two men or two women?

The word “marriage” isn’t simply a label that can be attached to different types of relationships. Instead, “marriage” reflects a deep reality – the reality of the unique, fruitful, lifelong union that is only possible between a man and a woman. Just as oxygen and hydrogen are essential to water, sexual difference is essential to marriage. The attempt to “redefine” marriage to include two persons of the same sex denies the reality of what marriage is. It is as impossible as trying to “redefine” water to include oxygen and nitrogen.

back to top

 

5. What is sexual difference?

Sexual difference is the difference of man to woman and woman to man. It affects a person at every level of his or her existence: genetically, biologically, emotionally, psychologically, and socially. Sexual difference is an irreducible difference. It is unlike any other difference we experience, because it – and only it – allows for the total personal union between husband and wife that is at the heart of marriage. The difference between men and women is for the sake of their union with each other. It is what makes spousal union possible.

back to top

 

6. Isn’t marriage just about love and commitment between two people?

Of course love and commitment are important for marriage – as they are for many relationships. But marriage is unique because the commitment it calls for is better described as communion, where “the two become one flesh” (Gen 2:24). Only a man and a woman in marriage can become a “one flesh” communion. The unity of husband and wife is so intimate that from it can come a “third,” the child – a new life to be welcomed and raised in love. No other relationship, no matter how loving or committed, can have this unique form of commitment – communion – that exists in marriage, between a husband and a wife.

back to top

 

7. Why does a person’s gender matter for marriage?

Gender matters for marriage because the body matters for love. My body is not simply “the shape of my skin.” Instead, my identity as a person (my “I”) is inseparable from the reality of my body – I am a body-person. As John Paul II said, the body reveals the person. It is a deeply personal reality, not just a biological fact (see TOB, sec. 9.4). The body is “taken up” into every human action, including the most important task of all: loving. Loving as a human person means loving as a man or as a woman. Marriage, the “primary form” of human love (GS, no. 12), necessarily involves the reality of men and women as body-persons. Marriage is intrinsically opposite-sex. To “write off” the body, and gender, as unimportant to marriage means treating the body as inconsequential or, at best, as an object or tool to be used according to one’s pleasure, instead of as an essential – and beautiful – aspect of being human and loving as a human person. Such a write-off would ignore the very essence of what marriage is.

back to top

 

8. How is the love between a husband and a wife irreducibly unique?

The love between a husband and a wife involves a free, total, and faithful mutual gift of self that not only expresses love, but also opens the spouses to receive the gift of a child. No other human interaction on earth is like this. This is why sexual intimacy is reserved for married love – marriage is the only context wherein sex between a man and a woman can speak the true language of self-gift. On the other hand, sexual behavior between two men or two women can never arrive at the oneness experienced between husband and wife, nor can these acts be life-giving. In fact, it is impossible for two persons of the same sex to make a total gift of self to each other as a husband and a wife do, bodily and personally. For this reason, such sexual behavior is harmful and always wrong, as it is incapable of authentically expressing conjugal love – love which by its nature includes the capacity to give oneself fully to the other and to receive the other precisely as gift in a total communion of mind, body and spirit. Therefore, no relationship between two persons of the same sex can ever be held up as equal or analogous to the relationship between husband and wife.

back to top

9. What is complementarity?

“Complementarity” refers to the unique – and fruitful – relationship between men and women. Both men and women are created in the image of God. Both have great dignity and worth. But equality does not mean “sameness”: a man is not a woman, and a woman is not a man. Instead, “male and female are distinct bodily ways of being human, of being open to God and to one another” (LL, p. 10). Because men and women are “complementary,” they bring different gifts to a relationship. In marriage, the complementarity of husband and wife is expressed very clearly in the act of conjugal love, having children, and fathering and mothering –actions that call for the collaboration – and unique gifts – of husband and wife.

back to top

 

10. Why does the Catholic Church care so much about marriage?

The Catholic Church cares about marriage because marriage is a fundamental good in itself and foundational to human existence and flourishing. Following the example of Jesus, the Church cares about the whole person, and all people. Marriage (or the lack thereof) affects everyone. Today, people all over the world are suffering because of the breakdown of the family – divorce, out-of-wedlock childbearing, and so on. Marriage is never just a “private” issue; it has public significance and public consequences. One only has to think of the connection between fatherless families and young men in jail to know that this is true. In addition, the proposal to “redefine” marriage to include two men or two women is really a proposal to “redefine” the human person, causing a forgetfulness of what it means to be a man or a woman. This is a basic injustice to men and women, children, and fathers and mothers. Marriage is truly one of the most important social justice issues of our time.

back to top

 

11. Where can I learn more about marriage?

The videos in the Marriage: Unique for a Reason series artistically explain the essential aspects of marriage, as well as why upholding marriage contributes to the common good. Check out “Made for Each Other” and “Made for Life,” as well as their companion Viewers’ Guides and Resource Booklets. Also, please visit the Church Teaching page to read Church documents on marriage.

 

Visit Marriageuniqueforareason.org for more information

 


Abbreviations

CCCCatechism of the Catholic Church, 2nd ed. (2000) – En Español: Catecismo de la Iglesia Católica

CIC Code of Canon Law (1983) – En Español

FC – Pope John Paul II, Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio (1982) – En Español

GS – Second Vatican Council, Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes (1965) –En Español

LL – USCCB, Pastoral Letter Marriage: Love and Life in the Divine Plan (2009) – En Español: El Matrimonio: El amor y la vida en el plan divino

TOB – Pope John Paul II, Man and Woman He Created Them: A Theology of the Body, trans. Michael Waldstein (Boston: Pauline Books & Media, 2006). John Paul II’s Wednesday audiences on the theology of the body are available online at EWTN’s website and at the Vatican website (see audiences from Sept. 5, 1979 – Nov. 28, 1984).


Español

El Significado del Matrimonio

--

El significado del matrimonio y la diferencia sexual

  1. El matrimonio: ¿Cuál es un buen punto de partida?
  2. ¿Dónde se origina el matrimonio?
  3. ¿Qué es el matrimonio?
  4. ¿Por qué no se puede “redefinir” el matrimonio para que incluya a dos hombres o a dos mujeres?
  5. ¿Qué es la diferencia sexual?
  6. ¿No es el matrimonio sólo el amor y el compromiso entre dos personas?
  7. ¿Por qué es importante para el matrimonio el género de la persona?
  8. ¿Qué es lo que hace que el amor entre marido y mujer sea irreductiblemente singular?
  9. ¿Qué es la complementariedad?
  10. ¿Por qué la Iglesia Católica valora tanto al matrimonio?
  11. ¿Dónde puedo aprender más acerca del matrimonio?

 

1. El matrimonio: ¿Cuál es un buen punto de partida?

El mejor punto de partida para entender lo que es un matrimonio, es con la persona humana. Después de todo, el matrimonio es una relación única entre dos personas específicas: un hombre y una mujer.  Debemos preguntar: “Como hombre o como mujer, ¿qué significa ser una persona humana?” Primero, Dios creó al hombre a su imagen; hombre y mujer los creó (ver Gén. 1:27). Esto significa que ellos tienen una gran dignidad y un gran valor. Asimismo, ya que “Dios es amor” (1 Jn 4:8) cada persona—creada a imagen y semejanza de Dios—encuentra su realización amando a los demás.  Segundo, los hombres y las mujeres son personas-cuerpo. El cuerpo—masculino o femenino—es una parte esencial del ser humano. El género no es un concepto adicional o una fabricación meramente social. El cuerpo determina lo que significa amar como una persona humana. Para resumir, cuando pensamos acerca del matrimonio, debemos pensar en quién es la persona humana—creada con una gran dignidad y llamada a amar como una persona-cuerpo, masculino o femenino.

volver arriba

 

2. ¿Dónde se origina el matrimonio?

“Es el mismo Dios el autor del matrimonio” (GS, no. 48). Cuando Dios creó a la persona humana a su imagen y semejanza, tanto a hombre como a mujer, Él puso en sus corazones el deseo, y la tarea, de amar—de entregarse por completo a otra persona. El matrimonio es una de dos  maneras en la cual uno puede entregarse totalmente (la otra es la virginidad, dedicándose totalmente a Dios) (ver FC, no. 11). El matrimonio no es algo inventado por la sociedad o por alguna religión—más bien, surge de la persona humana, como hombre y como mujer, y la sociedad y la religión lo afirman y lo apoyan. La verdad del matrimonio es, por tanto, accesible a todos, sin tomar en consideración sus creencias religiosas o la falta de ellas. Tanto la fe como la razón confirman el verdadero significado del matrimonio.

volver arriba

 

3. ¿Qué es el matrimonio?

El matrimonio es una relación vitalicia de fidelidad mutua y exclusiva entre un hombre y una mujer, ordenado por su misma índole natural al bien de los cónyuges y a la generación y educación de los hijos (ver CIC, no. 1601; CDC, can. 1055.1; GS, no. 48). El lazo del matrimonio es indisoluble—esto es, perdura “hasta que la muerte nos separe”. En su realidad más profunda, el amor conyugal los hace capaces, tanto al esposo como a la esposa, de entregarse libre y completamente, uno al otro. Debido a su diferencia sexual, los cónyuges realmente pueden convertirse “en una sola carne”, dándose uno al otro “la realidad  del hijo, reflejo viviente de su amor” (FC, no. 14)

El matrimonio entre un hombre bautizado y una mujer bautizada es un sacramento.  Esto significa que el lazo entre marido y mujer es una señal visible del amor expiatorio de Cristo por su Iglesia. Como sacramento, el matrimonio les da a los cónyuges la gracia que ellos necesitan para amarse generosamente uno al otro, imitando a Cristo.

volver arriba

 

4. ¿Por qué no se puede “redefinir” el matrimonio para que incluya a dos hombres o a dos mujeres?

La palabra “matrimonio” no es una etiqueta que se le puede colocar a diferentes tipos de relaciones.  Al contrario, “matrimonio” refleja una realidad profunda—la realidad de una unión única, fructífera y para toda la vida que sólo es posible entre un hombre y una mujer.  Así como el oxígeno y el hidrógeno son esenciales para el agua, la diferencia sexual es esencial para el matrimonio.  El intento de “redefinir” el matrimonio para incluir a dos personas del mismo sexo niega la realidad de lo que es un matrimonio.  Es tan imposible como tratar de “redefinir” el agua para que incluya oxígeno y nitrógeno.

volver arriba

 

5. ¿Qué es la diferencia sexual?

Diferencia sexual es la diferencia de hombre a mujer y de mujer a hombre. Esta afecta a una persona en todos los niveles de su existencia: genético, biológico, emocional, sicológico y social. La diferencia sexual es una diferencia irreducible. No se parece a ninguna diferencia que hayamos experimentado, ya que ella—y sólo ella—permite la plena unión personal entre marido y mujer, lo cual es algo fundamental en el matrimonio. La diferencia entre los hombres y las mujeres es por el bien de su unión con cada uno. Eso es lo que hace posible la unión conyugal.

volver arriba

 

6. ¿No es el matrimonio sólo el amor y el compromiso entre dos personas?

Por supuesto que el amor y el compromiso son importantes para el matrimonio—así como lo son para muchas otras relaciones.  Pero el matrimonio es único pues el compromiso que éste exige se define mejor como una comunión, en donde “serán los dos una sola carne” (Gén 2:24). Sólo un hombre y una mujer en matrimonio pueden convertirse en una comunión de “una sola carne”. La unidad de marido y mujer es tan íntima que de ésta surge un “tercero”, el hijo—una nueva vida que se recibe y se cría con amor. No existe otra relación, no importa cuán amorosa o comprometida, que pueda tener este singular carácter de compromiso—de comunión—que existe dentro del matrimonio, entre un esposo y una esposa.

volver arriba

 

7. ¿Por qué es importante para el matrimonio el género de la persona?

El género de la persona es importante para el matrimonio porque el cuerpo es importante para el amor. Mi cuerpo no es simplemente “la conformación de mi piel”. Mas bien, mi identidad como persona (mi “yo”) es inseparable de la realidad de mi cuerpo—yo soy una persona-cuerpo. Como lo dijo el Papa Juan Pablo II, el cuerpo revela a la persona. Esta es una realidad profundamente personal, no sólo un hecho biológico (ver TDC, sec. 9.4). El cuerpo “participa” en cada acción humana, incluyendo la tarea más importante de todas: la de amar. Amar como una persona humana significa amar como un hombre o como una mujer. El matrimonio, la “expresión primera” de amor humano (GS, no. 12), involucra necesariamente la realidad del hombre y de la mujer como personas-cuerpo. El matrimonio es, intrínsecamente, sexo opuesto. “Desechar” el cuerpo, y el género, como algo sin importancia para el matrimonio significa que tratamos al cuerpo como algo sin trascendencia o, en el mejor de los casos, como un objeto o herramienta para ser usada según el placer de uno, en vez del aspecto esencial—y bello—de ser humano y amoroso como una persona humana.  El “desechar” eso ignoraría la esencia misma de lo que es el matrimonio.

volver arriba

 

8. ¿Qué es lo que hace que el amor entre marido y mujer sea irreductiblemente singular?

El amor entre marido y mujer conlleva una entrega libre, total, fiel y mutua de sí mismos que no sólo expresa el amor sino que también apertura a los cónyuges a recibir el don de un hijo. En la tierra no existe otra interacción humana como ésta.  Es por eso que las relaciones íntimas se reservan para el amor conyugal—el matrimonio es el único contexto en donde el sexo entre un hombre y una mujer puede manifestar el verdadero lenguaje de la entrega de uno mismo. Por otro lado, el comportamiento sexual entre dos hombres o entre dos mujeres nunca puede llegar a esa unidad que viven marido y mujer, ni estos actos pueden ser dadores de vida. De hecho, es imposible que dos personas del mismo sexo puedan entregarse totalmente una a la otra como lo hacen marido y mujer, en cuerpo y en persona. Por esta razón, tal comportamiento sexual es dañino y es siempre erróneo, ya que es incapaz de expresar auténticamente el amor conyugal—un amor que, por naturaleza propia, incluye la capacidad de entregarse plenamente uno al otro y de recibir exactamente al otro como un don en una comunión plena de mente, cuerpo y espíritu. Por lo tanto, ninguna relación entre dos personas del mismo sexo podría colocarse como igual o análoga a la relación entre marido y mujer.

volver arriba

 

9. ¿Qué es la complementariedad?

La “complementariedad” se refiere a la singular—y fructífera—relación entre hombres y mujeres. Tanto el hombre como la mujer fueron creados a imagen y semejanza de Dios. Ambos tienen una gran dignidad y valor. Pero igualdad no significa que sean “idénticos”: un hombre no es una mujer y una mujer no es un hombre. En cambio, “el varón y la mujer son maneras corporales distintas de ser humanos, de estar abiertos a Dios y entre sí” (AV, p.10). Ya que los hombres y las mujeres son “complementarios”, ellos traen diferentes dones a la relación.  En el matrimonio, la complementariedad de marido y mujer es expresada claramente en el acto del amor conyugal, teniendo hijos y siendo padre y madre—acciones que exigen la colaboración—y los singulares dones—de marido y mujer.

volver arriba

 

10. ¿Por qué la Iglesia Católica valora tanto el matrimonio?

La Iglesia Católica valora el matrimonio porque el matrimonio, en sí, es un bien esencial y es fundamental para la existencia y el florecimiento humano. Siguiendo el ejemplo de Jesús, la Iglesia valora a toda la persona y a toda la gente.  El matrimonio (o la ausencia de éste) afecta a todos. Hoy en día, personas en todo el mundo están sufriendo por la desintegración de la familia—divorcio, hijos fuera del matrimonio, etc. Nunca el matrimonio es únicamente un asunto “privado”; éste tiene importancia pública y consecuencias públicas. Uno sólo tiene que ver la relación que existe entre las familias donde falta el padre y los jóvenes que están en prisión para darse cuenta que eso es verdad. Además, la propuesta para “redefinir” el matrimonio para que incluya a dos hombres o a dos mujeres es realmente una propuesta para “redefinir” a la persona humana, que causaría el olvido de lo que significa ser un hombre o una mujer. Esto es una injusticia elemental para hombres y mujeres, para los hijos y para los padres y madres. El matrimonio es realmente uno de los más importantes asuntos de justicia social de nuestros tiempos.

volver arriba

 

11. ¿Dónde puedo aprender más acerca del matrimonio?

Los videos de la serie Marriage: Unique for a Reason explican en forma artística los aspectos esenciales del matrimonio y cómo, al apoyar al matrimonio, se contribuye al bien común. Vea  “El Matrimonio: Hecho para el amor y la vida”, así como la Guía del espectador y los folletos de recursos.  Visite también la página de los Recursos para leer los documentos de la Iglesia relacionados al matrimonio.

Si desea obtener información adicional, visite Marriageuniqueforareason.org/espanol

 


Lista de las abreviaturas

AV – Conferencia de Obispos Católicos de los Estados Unidos, Carta pastoral El matrimonio: El amor y la vida en el plan divino (2009)

CDCCódigo de Derecho Canónico (1983)

CICCatecismo de la Iglesia Católica (1997)

FCPapa Juan Pablo II, Exhortación apostólica Familiaris Consortio (1982)

GS Concilio Vaticano II, Constitución pastoral Gaudium et Spes (1965)

TDCPapa Juan Pablo II,  La Teología del Cuerpo  (Se puede leer en el website Vaticano: audiencias 5 sept. 1979 – 28 nov. 1984.)