Catholic Diocese of Dallas

Facebook   Twitter   Facebook    Pinterest   LinkedIn   Vimeo   RSS      

 

En Español - Texto completo de la homilía del Papa Francisco para el Consistorio

Full text of Pope Francis' homily for the Consistory

Publish date: Saturday, November 19, 2016

--

On Saturday, November 19th, 2016, the Most Reverend Kevin J. Farrell, former Bishop of the Diocese of Dallas, was made a Cardinal at a special Consistory ceremony presided by Pope Francis. Cardinal Farrell had served as the Bishop of the Diocese of Dallas from 2007 until October  1st, 2016 after Pope Francis announced that he had chosen the Cardinal-designate as the Prefect of the new Vatican Dicastery (Department) for the Laity, Family and Life. Cardinal-designate Farrell moved to Rome on October 6th and just three days later the Holy Father announced on Oct. 9th that he would elevate the former bishop to Cardinal.

Pope Francis, in his homily at the Consistory which took place in St Peter’s Basilica on Saturday, reflected on the Lord’s “Sermon on the Plain,” found in the Gospel of St Luke.

The Holy Father said that, by taking the Apostles down from the mountaintop and setting them in the midst of the people on the plain, our Lord “shows the Apostles, and ourselves, that the true heights are reached on the plain, while the plain reminds us that the heights are found in a gaze and above all in a call: ‘Be merciful as the Father is merciful’.”

Speaking to the newly created Cardinals, Pope Francis said, “Today each of you, dear brothers, is asked to cherish in your own heart, and in the heart, this summons to be merciful like the Father.”

Read the full text of the Pope’s homily, as prepared:

--

Homily of His Holiness Pope Francis

Consistory for the Creation of New Cardinals
19 November 2016

The Gospel passage we have just heard (cf. Lk 6:27-36) is often referred to as the “Sermon on the Plain”.  After choosing the Twelve, Jesus came down with his disciples to a great multitude of people who were waiting to hear him and to be healed.  The call of the Apostles is linked to this “setting out”, descending to the plain to encounter the multitudes who, as the Gospel says, were “troubled” (cf. v. 18).   Instead of keeping the Apostles at the top of the mountain, their being chosen leads them to the heart of the crowd; it sets them in the midst of those who are troubled, on the “plain” of their daily lives.  The Lord thus shows the Apostles, and ourselves, that the true heights are reached on the plain, while the plain reminds us that the heights are found in a gaze and above all in a call: “Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful” (v. 36). 

This call is accompanied by four commands or exhortations, which the Lord gives as a way of moulding the Apostles’ vocation through real, everyday situations.  They are four actions that will shape, embody and make tangible the path of discipleship.  We could say that they represent four stages of a mystagogy of mercy: love, do good, bless and pray.  I think we can all agree on these, and see them as something reasonable.  They are four things we can easily do for our friends and for those more or less close to us, people we like, people whose tastes and habits are similar to our own.

The problem comes when Jesus tells us for whom we have do these things.  Here he is very clear.  He minces no words, he uses no euphemisms.  He tells us: love your enemies; do good to those who hate you; bless those who curse you; pray for those who mistreat you (cf. vv. 27-28).

These are not things we spontaneously do in dealing with people we consider our opponents or enemies.  Our first instinctive reaction in such cases is to dismiss, discredit or curse them.  Often we try to “demonize” them, so as to have a “sacred” justification for dismissing them.  Jesus tells us to do exactly the opposite with our enemies, those who hate us, those who curse us or slander us.  We are to love them, to do good to them, to bless them and to pray for them.

Here we find ourselves confronted with one of the very hallmarks of Jesus’ message, where its power and secret are concealed.  Here too is the source of our joy, the power of our mission and our preaching of the Good News.  My enemy is someone I must love.  In God’s heart there are no enemies.  God only has sons and daughters.  We are the ones who raise walls, build barriers and label people.  God has sons and daughters, precisely so that no one will be turned away.  God’s love has the flavour of fidelity towards everyone, for it is a visceral love, a parental love that never abandons us, even when we go astray.  Our Father does not wait for us to be good before he loves the world, he does not wait for us to be a little bit better or more perfect before he loves us; he loves us because he chose to love us, he loves us because he has made us his sons and daughters.  He loved us even when we were enemies (cf. Rom 5:10).  The Father’s unconditional love for all people was, and is, the true prerequisite for the conversion of our pitiful hearts that tend to judge, divide, oppose and condemn.  To know that God continues to love even those who reject him is a boundless source of confidence and an impetus for our mission.  No matter how sullied our hands may be, God cannot be stopped from placing in those hands the Life he wishes to bestow on us.

Ours is an age of grave global problems and issues.  We live at a time in which polarization and exclusion are burgeoning and considered the only way to resolve conflicts.  We see, for example, how quickly those among us with the status of a stranger, an immigrant, or a refugee, become a threat, take on the status of an enemy.  An enemy because they come from a distant country or have different customs.  An enemy because of the colour of their skin, their language or their social class.  An enemy because they think differently or even have a different faith.  An enemy because…  And, without our realizing it, this way of thinking becomes part of the way we live and act.  Everything and everyone then begins to savour of animosity.  Little by little, our differences turn into symptoms of hostility, threats and violence.  How many wounds grow deeper due to this epidemic of animosity and violence, which leaves its mark on the flesh of many of the defenceless, because their voice is weak and silenced by this pathology of indifference!  How many situations of uncertainty and suffering are sown by this growing animosity between peoples, between us!  Yes, between us, within our communities, our priests, our meetings.  The virus of polarization and animosity permeates our way of thinking, feeling and acting.  We are not immune from this and we need to take care lest such attitudes find a place in our hearts, because this would be contrary to the richness and universality of the Church, which is tangibly evident in the College of Cardinals.  We come from distant lands; we have different traditions, skin colour, languages and social backgrounds; we think differently and we celebrate our faith in a variety of rites.  None of this makes us enemies; instead, it is one of our greatest riches.

Dear brothers and sisters, Jesus never stops “coming down from the mountain”.  He constantly desires to enter the crossroads of our history to proclaim the Gospel of Mercy.  Jesus continues to call us and to send us to the “plain” where our people dwell.  He continues to invite us to spend our lives sustaining our people in hope, so that they can be signs of reconciliation.  As the Church, we are constantly being asked to open our eyes to see the wounds of so many of our brothers and sisters deprived of their dignity, deprived in their dignity.

My dear brothers, newly created Cardinals, the journey towards heaven begins in the plains, in a daily life broken and shared, spent and given.  In the quiet daily gift of all that we are.  Our mountaintop is this quality of love; our goal and aspiration is to strive, on life’s plain, together with the People of God, to become persons capable of forgiveness and reconciliation.

Today each of you, dear brothers, is asked to cherish in your own heart, and in the heart of the Church, this summons to be merciful like the Father.  And to realize that “if something should rightly disturb us and trouble our consciences, it is the fact that so many of our brothers and sisters are living without the strength, light and consolation born of friendship with Jesus Christ, without a community of faith to support them, without meaning and a goal in life” (Evangelii Gaudium, 49).

 

--

Sources: News.va, YouTube


Español

Texto completo de la homilía del Papa Francisco para el Consistorio

--

En su homilía durante el Consistorio que tuvo lugar en la Basílica de San Pedro el sábado, el Papa Francisco, reflexionó en el "Sermón de la Llanura" del Evangelio de San Lucas.

En su homilía, el Santo Padre recordó que después de la institución de los doce, Jesús bajó con sus discípulos a donde una muchedumbre lo esperaba para escucharlo y sanar. El camino al cielo –precisó a los neo purpurados- comienza “en el llano”, en la cotidianeidad de la vida partida y compartida, de una vida gastada y entregada. En la entrega silenciosa y cotidiana de lo que somos. “Nuestra cumbre es esta calidad del amor; nuestra meta y deseo es buscar en la llanura de la vida, junto al Pueblo de Dios, transformarnos en personas capaces de perdón y reconciliación”, reflexionó.

“Jesús no deja de ‘bajar del monte’, no deja de querer insertarnos en la encrucijada de nuestra historia para anunciar el Evangelio de la Misericordia. Jesús nos sigue llamando y enviando al ‘llano’ de nuestros pueblos, nos sigue invitando a gastar nuestras vidas levantando la esperanza de nuestra gente, siendo signos de reconciliación, puntualizó el Obispo de Roma, pidiendo a estos pastores cuidar en su corazón y en el de la Iglesia esta invitación a ser misericordioso como el Padre.

Lea el texto complete de la homilía del Papa:

Homilía de su Santidad Papa Francisco

Consistorio para la Creación de Nuevos Cardenales
19 de Noviembre de 2016

Al texto del Evangelio que terminamos de escuchar (cf. Lc 6,27-36), muchos lo han llamado «el Sermón de la llanura». Después de la institución de los doce, Jesús bajó con sus discípulos a donde una muchedumbre lo esperaba para escucharlo y hacerse sanar. El llamado de los apóstoles va acompañado de este «ponerse en marcha» hacia la llanura, hacia el encuentro de una muchedumbre que, como dice el texto del Evangelio, estaba «atormentada» (cf. v. 18). La elección, en vez de mantenerlos en lo alto del monte, en su cumbre, los lleva al corazón de la multitud, los pone en medio de sus tormentos, en el llano de sus vidas. De esta forma, el Señor les y nos revela que la verdadera cúspide se realiza en la llanura, y la llanura nos recuerda que la cúspide se encuentra en una mirada y especialmente en una llamada: «Sean misericordiosos, como el Padre de ustedes es misericordioso» (v. 36).

Una invitación acompañada de cuatro imperativos, podríamos decir de cuatro exhortaciones que el Señor les hace para plasmar su vocación en lo concreto, en lo cotidiano de la vida. Son cuatro acciones que darán forma, darán carne y harán tangible el camino del discípulo. Podríamos decir que son cuatro etapas de la mistagogia de la misericordia: amen, hagan el bien, bendigan y rueguen. Creo que en estos aspectos todos podemos coincidir y hasta nos resultan razonables. Son cuatro acciones que fácilmente realizamos con nuestros amigos, con las personas más o menos cercanas, cercanas en el afecto, en la idiosincrasia, en las costumbres.

El problema surge cuando Jesús nos presenta los destinarios de estas acciones, y en esto es muy claro, no anda con vueltas ni eufemismos: Amen a sus enemigos, hagan el bien a los que los odian, bendigan a los que los maldicen, rueguen por los que los difaman (cf. vv. 27-28).

Y estas no son acciones que surgen espontáneas con quien está delante de nosotros como un adversario, como un enemigo. Frente a ellos, nuestra actitud primera e instintiva es descalificarlos, desautorizarlos, maldecirlos; buscamos en muchos casos «demonizarlos», a fin de tener una «santa» justificación para sacárnoslos de encima. En cambio, Jesús nos dice que al enemigo, al que te odia, al que te maldice o difama: ámalo, hazle el bien, bendícelo y ruega por él.

Nos encontramos frente a una de las características más propias del mensaje de Jesús, allí donde esconde su fuerza y su secreto; allí radica la fuente de nuestra alegría, la potencia de nuestro andar y el anuncio de la buena nueva. El enemigo es alguien a quien debo amar. En el corazón de Dios no hay enemigos, Dios tiene hijos. Nosotros levantamos muros, construimos barreras y clasificamos a las personas. Dios tiene hijos y no precisamente para sacárselos de encima. El amor de Dios tiene sabor a fidelidad con las personas, porque es amor de entrañas, un amor maternal/paternal que no las deja abandonadas, incluso cuando se hayan equivocado. Nuestro Padre no espera a amar al mundo cuando seamos buenos, no espera a amarnos cuando seamos menos injustos o perfectos; nos ama porque eligió amarnos, nos ama porque nos ha dado el estatuto de hijos. Nos ha amado incluso cuando éramos enemigos suyos (cf. Rm 5,10). El amor incondicionado del Padre para con todos ha sido, y es, verdadera exigencia de conversión para nuestro pobre corazón que tiende a juzgar, dividir, oponer y condenar. Saber que Dios sigue amando incluso a quien lo rechaza es una fuente ilimitada de confianza y estímulo para la misión. Ninguna mano sucia puede impedir que Dios ponga en esa mano la Vida que quiere regalarnos.

La nuestra es una época caracterizada por fuertes cuestionamientos e interrogantes a escala mundial. Nos toca transitar un tiempo donde resurgen epidémicamente, en nuestras sociedades, la polarización y la exclusión como única forma posible de resolver los conflictos. Vemos, por ejemplo, cómo rápidamente el que está a nuestro lado ya no sólo posee el estado de desconocido o inmigrante o refugiado, sino que se convierte en una amenaza; posee el estado de enemigo. Enemigo por venir de una tierra lejana o por tener otras costumbres. Enemigo por su color de piel, por su idioma o su condición social, enemigo por pensar diferente e inclusive por tener otra fe. Enemigo por… Y sin darnos cuenta esta lógica se instala en nuestra forma de vivir, de actuar y proceder. Entonces, todo y todos comienzan a tener sabor de enemistad. Poco a poco las diferencias se transforman en sinónimos de hostilidad, amenaza y violencia. Cuántas heridas crecen por esta epidemia de enemistad y de violencia, que se sella en la carne de muchos que no tienen voz porque su grito se ha debilitado y silenciado a causa de esta patología de la indiferencia. Cuántas situaciones de precariedad y sufrimiento se siembran por este crecimiento de enemistad entre los pueblos, entre nosotros. Sí, entre nosotros, dentro de nuestras comunidades, de nuestros presbiterios, de nuestros encuentros. El virus de la polarización y la enemistad se nos cuela en nuestras formas de pensar, de sentir y de actuar. No somos inmunes a esto y tenemos que velar para que esta actitud no cope nuestro corazón, porque iría contra la riqueza y la universalidad de la Iglesia que podemos palpar en este Colegio Cardenalicio. Venimos de tierras lejanas, tenemos diferentes costumbres, color de piel, idiomas y condición social; pensamos distinto e incluso celebramos la fe con ritos diversos. Y nada de esto nos hace enemigos, al contrario, es una de nuestras mayores riquezas.

Queridos hermanos, Jesús no deja de «bajar del monte», no deja de querer insertarnos en la encrucijada de nuestra historia para anunciar el Evangelio de la Misericordia. Jesús nos sigue llamando y enviando al «llano» de nuestros pueblos, nos sigue invitando a gastar nuestras vidas levantando la esperanza de nuestra gente, siendo signos de reconciliación. Como Iglesia, seguimos siendo invitados a abrir nuestros ojos para mirar las heridas de tantos hermanos y hermanas privados de su dignidad, privados en su dignidad.

Querido hermano neo Cardenal, el camino al cielo comienza en el llano, en la cotidianeidad de la vida partida y compartida, de una vida gastada y entregada. En la entrega silenciosa y cotidiana de lo que somos. Nuestra cumbre es esta calidad del amor; nuestra meta y deseo es buscar en la llanura de la vida, junto al Pueblo de Dios, transformarnos en personas capaces de perdón y reconciliación.

Querido hermano, hoy se te pide cuidar en tu corazón y en el de la Iglesia esta invitación a ser misericordioso como el Padre, sabiendo que «si hay algo que debe inquietarnos santamente y preocupar nuestras conciencias es que tantos hermanos vivan sin la fuerza, sin la luz y el consuelo de la amistad con Jesucristo, sin una comunidad de fe que los contenga, sin un horizonte de sentido que dé vida» (Exhort. ap. Evangelii Gaudium, 49).

 

--

Sources: News.va, YouTube